Touch-type, Read and Spell with confidence

An award-winning, multi-sensory course that
teaches typing, reading and spelling

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It is particularly useful for those with dyslexia, DCD/dyspraxia…

TTRS is an excellent program in which you can work on spelling at the same time as learning to touch-type. It is particularly useful for those with dyslexia, DCD/dyspraxia, ASD, ADHD, or working memory and processing weaknesses. This is because it uses repetition and real words right from the start. There are no "finger-muddling" key combinations and it has an easy-to-use settings panel.

By Amanda McLeod

Features


Optional Tutor Support

Supplement your learning with a TTRS trained Tutor

Modular in design

Each module is designed to be short in length with regular, positive feedback

Highly structured

Course content is based on the word lists of ‘Alpha to Omega’ and takes an Orton Gillingham approach to reading instruction

Multi-sensory

Uses visual, auditory and kinesthetic (touch) senses for a fully immersive learning experience

Research based

TTRS was developed in line with language and education research and is routinely supported by new studies

Multiple levels of difficulty

TTRS consists of 24 course levels, each of 31 modules - 4,000 words in all

Adaptive interface

Colours, fonts and designs can be customised for the learner to meet every individual's needs

Used worldwide

Used by dyslexia associations worldwide, including the British Dyslexia Association

How does TTRS work?

Modular design

TTRS is modular in design and contains 24 levels with 31 modules in each level. A module typically takes a few minutes to complete and we recommend taking 2-3 modules a session. Student success is encouraged by immediate feedback and positive reinforcement. This feedback includes a score that is based on completion rates and accuracy, not speed.

First score – first success

The course starts with learning to touch-type, read and spell the vowels – a , e , i , o , u. The audio track accompanies the letters as they appear on screen, reinforcing sound-letter correspondence, which is a crucial skill for sounding out words in reading. The user then receives their first score – and success!

Phonics and repetition

In the second module, words are introduced through onset and rime. For example – fed, wed, led. This teaches phonics in context and at the same time the student learns the position of the keys using the on-screen hand guides.

With repetition, words move from short-term to long-term memory and the skill of typing begins to feel more comfortable.  Repetition is also a way of over-learning that can help users with dyslexia overcome working memory and processing difficulties.

Multi-sensory approach

TTRS takes a multi-sensory approach to repetition learning. Through the multi-sensory approach, a user hears the words spoken through headphones or speakers, sees the words printed on the screen, and is prompted as to which fingers to press via the on-screen keyboard.

Finally, through the sense of touch, they type out the words, harnessing muscle-memory in the hands and fingers to learn spelling.

 

Meet more TTRS users

Read and Spell Blog

Teach yourself to type

Teach yourself to type

Most adult learning programs and libraries offer basic skills computer courses, but is it possible to learn how to touch type on your own? Of course. If you have access to a computer, there are plenty of self-study programs that can help you get started. 

One of the first things you need to learn is the home-row position on the keyboard – also known as the home keys.

7 Ways to help a frustrated student

7 Ways to help a frustrated student

Students who are confused may quickly become frustrated in the classroom if they are pressured to perform. It may be the case that attention or processing difficulties have prevented a learner from understanding a lesson, or that the instructions for a particular assignment are not clear to them.

In some cases motor skills difficulties, such as problems with handwriting, prevent a child from demonstrating their knowledge.

When cognitive ability and creativity are present but productive and receptive language skills are compromised, such as by dyslexia, a child may feel frustrated with underperformance and/or a lack of progress.

Frustration can arise when a student works in a particular subject area. Some learners may become frustrated in English class whereas others find following the steps in math problems frustrating.
 
Frustration may also be related to students having high expectations for performance, such as wanting to get every answer correct or produce error-free writing that doesn’t need revisions.

Teaching math facts

Teaching math facts

Math facts are basic calculations that children can learn in order to help them do arithmetic more quickly. By committing math facts to memory, they can be recalled fluently so attention is freed for working on higher order math functions.

Drills are often the first thing that comes to mind, but the goal for parents and teachers is to help children automatize these facts in as painless of a way as possible - even better if it can be fun!